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Ways to Deal with Insurance Adjusters after a Motorcycle Accident

When you've been injured in a motorcycle crash, you'll hear from an insurance adjuster. In fact, one of your first phone calls after the accident may be the adjuster. Adjusters want to figure out what happened and the severity of your injuries. You likely won't be in the frame of mind to have a conversation with an insurance adjuster. You may feel confused or you may not remember every detail of the accident. Also, you may not be aware of the extent of your injuries, especially if you haven't had a thorough medical evaluation. Here are a few ways you can deal with those initial conversations with insurance adjusters.

Know Who You're Talking To

Before you say anything, make sure you know whether you're speaking to an adjuster from your insurance company or one from the other party's company. If the adjuster represents your own insurance company, you must cooperate. Cooperation is a duty that you have as the insured party. This means you're obligated to participate in the investigation of your insurance claim. Be wary when the adjuster is calling on behalf of the other party involved in the accident. While your insurance company is concerned about you, their provider is focused primarily on saving the company money. They may ask you for a recorded statement. You're not required to give one. In fact, you shouldn't before you talk with your attorney.

Don't Sign Documents

Of course, there will be a variety of documents you'll likely sign as part of the insurance claim process. Be cautious about signing anything from an insurance adjuster. The other party's insurance company wants your medical records. An adjuster will ask you to sign a medical release. This allows the insurance company to obtain your medical records. The issue with this is the potential for them to gain access to more of your medical information than is needed to settle the claim. The adjuster could use the medical release to speak directly to your doctor. That's not an ideal situation since your doctor may not know how to speak with an insurance company. The best way to handle medical records is to gather the documents from your accident, copy them, and send them to the insurance company.

Wait to Settle Your Claim

Remember, the other party's insurance company isn't your friend. The adjuster's job is to save the insurance company money. One way they do this is by offering a quick settlement to the injured party. In some cases, an adjuster may try to settle your case before you even see a doctor. Their offer will never be for the value of your case. If you do accept a settlement, you'll sign a release. Once that happens, the adjuster knows you're not likely to come back and file a claim if your damages and losses end up being higher than you initially thought. The reason a quick settlement isn't a good idea is that you won't have time to get an accurate assessment of your injuries or damage to your motorcycle and other personal property. You may not feel like you're seriously injured and still have internal injuries. Wait until you've been thoroughly examined by a doctor, then talk with a lawyer. Both can prevent you from making a mistake by agreeing to something that isn't in your best interest.

If you've been injured, contact an attorney who specializes in motorcycle accidents. Call Steelhorse Law's 24-hour hotline at 1-888-38-COURT (1-888-382-6878).



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