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A Guide to Different Motorcycle Accident Types copy

Motorcycle enthusiasts take to the road to get from point A to point B, but, as any rider knows, there's much more to it than that. It's the thrill of the open road, the feeling of independence, and the wind against their faces coupled with the warmth of a partner at their backs that inspires motorcycle riders to climb on their bikes and hit the road. No matter how safe a motorcyclist is, he or she still may face challenges on the road, particularly other drivers. Being aware of the most common types of motorcycle accidents can help riders navigate the roads defensively. Here's a short guide to some of the most common types of motorcycle accidents.

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Left-Lane Turns

According to a 2010 report by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, about 40% of all automobile accidents in 2008 occurred at intersections. More often than not, one of the automobiles in the accident was attempting to turn left. The report theorizes that these accidents are often the result of one driver misjudging the speed of another, by one driver failing to signal, by a driver failing to yield, or due to obstructed views at the intersection. Some of these challenges are enhanced for motorcycle riders because the small size of a motorcycle makes it more difficult for other drivers to see. You can drive defensively in an effort to avoid left-hand turn accidents by being cautious about vehicles at intersections.

Head-On Collisions

Head-on collisions are extremely dangerous for all drivers, but they're especially frightening for motorcyclists. In most head-on collisions involving a motorcycle and another vehicle, the rider rarely walks away unscathed, and he or she is very lucky to escape serious injury or death. There are a few proactive steps riders can take to help prevent head-on collisions. Known as the Four Rs, these defensive driving tactics include:

· Reading the road ahead

· Driving to the Right

· Reducing speed and

· Riding off the road

Motorcyclists who continually scan the road ahead watching for potential dangers are reading the road. Driving to the right involves riding in the right-hand lane whenever possible, and when on a two-lane road, riding near the right side of the lane. Reduce your speed if you see an erratic driver and ride to the side of the road onto the shoulder, if necessary.

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Lane-Splitting Accidents

You may have seen-or even attempted yourself-to ride your motorcycle down the middle of two lanes of stalled or slow-moving traffic. This is dangerous and is a common cause of accidents. Attempting to share the lane with cars to gain a traffic advantage limits the maneuverability of your motorcycle, and it may come as a surprise to other drivers. Though lane splitting is legal for motorcyclists in some states, riders should proceed with caution. The practice can lead to accidents, damage to your motorcycle, and serious injury.

Riding a motorcycle is a great thrill and joy for enthusiasts. With defensive riding and an enhanced understanding of how and why motorcycle accidents occur, riders can take to the road in a way that increases safety for everyone on the street.

If you've been in a motorcycle accident and are looking for an attorney in Georgia, Tennessee, or South Carolina, contact Steelhorse Law at 1-888-38-COURT.



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